Before the arrival of modern-day refrigeration, a traditional method of preservation was to smoke fresh or cured foods over smouldering wood. Nowadays we tend to mostly use smoke to impart wonderful aromatic flavours to a wide range of foods. This method, known as cold smoking, is the process of creating wood smoke without cooking or heating your food.

Cold smoking is usually done at temperatures below 21°C / 71°F and foods are usually smoked for several hours.  Some foods, such as pork and salmon need to be cured before they are smoked.  Generally, either a dry cure or a wet cure (a brine) is used – the choice of curing method depends on the type of food and personal preference.  Other foods such as cheese, salt, butter, nuts and garlic do not need to be cured before being smoked.